Let’s get straight to the point: $1,500 – $45,000 if you hire us. Other firms charge more, some charge less. Let’s look at what the options are and how we range from less than two grand to tens of thousands of dollars. 

What is a Brand? 

The first thing to understand about a brand is that it’s more than the logo. It’s the entire personality of a company. A good brand connects every sense to your message. Things look, sound, and feel cohesive. You can even go after all five senses and design smell and taste. Our favorite Las Vegas hotel has two signature scents, one for the lobby and one for the spa, and that smell instantly transports us.

A brand unites every customer touchpoint and how you present your information, your tone of voice, and every piece of digital and physical media. 

A brand is more than a logo—it’s the
entire personality of a company.

What makes a good brand? 

The logo is the centerpiece of the brand. It will turn into the most hardworking piece of design you will commission. It not only has to look great and connote meaning—it also has to stand up with variations for different conditions. A good logo works when it holds up in one color or when its embroidered on a jacket or when it’s imprinted. 

The logo is joined in branding by the use of typefaces, colors, and icons. A good brand has an extensive enough color palette to be easy to work with, but stays consistent. The choice of typefaces in a brand can say as much about a company as the logo—does that brand need a classic serif or a modern sans serif? Is there something more on-trend that might fit? Good brand icons may be cute and bespoke, or they may adhere to Google Material Design—the choice is determined by the kind of personality a brand is conveying. 

The absolute best brands are consistent on every touchpoint. They always use the same colors, the same logo placement, the same tone of voice, the same brand personality. Think of some of the best brands in the world, can you think of their logo, their colors, a general sense of what they are about? 

How in-depth does your branding project need to be?

There is a reason we offer such a wide range in prices—not every project needs a strategic branding deep dive. We work with clients to determine the right size for them. We use the following criteria to determine which brand solution is the best:

  • Size of the company
  • How long the company has been in business
  • Industry and industry position

If your company is small and you are just starting out, we recommend our quick logo package—you are too new in the business to really understand your market and your position in it. Even if you think you do—and we’ve helped launch dozens of established companies and startups—we know that some experience in your business will give you much needed perspective on a deep branding project. We’ve seen new companies spend thousands on brands, only to have to redo them in a few years.

What does a $1,500 brand project look like? 

Our $1,500 branding solution is quick and streamlined so you can get focused on the business you are running. We meet with you and do a branding consultation. We then work on two to three concepts for you to review. From there, we work with you to refine the final logo in two to three rounds of revisions.

What does a $20,000–45,000 brand project look like? 

A larger brand project includes many more exercises and deliverables. We meet for a kickoff to the process and go over a strategic branding questionnaire. Often in these meetings, we’ll ask a few off the wall questions to get at the heart of your branding. We want to make sure we’re helping you craft the personality of a company that will support many people for many years. 

We’ve chosen to work with companies that have been in business for at least three years before we take on a strategic branding project. While we’ve made an exception to the rule a couple of times, we find that rebrands are exciting projects that churn out amazing results. 

A strategic branding project includes a competitive review. We make a set of cards to keep the branding and messaging of your competitors clear and focused. We want to make sure you are in league with—but clearly differentiated from—your competition. 

Pie chart showing how much time is spent on each part of a branding project. Percentages are rounded. 
Stakeholder Deep Dive: 6%
Research: 13%
Initial Design & Revise: 26%
Brand Guide: 32%
Branding Applications: 13%
Project Management:  10%
A view into the breakdown of hours on a large brand project.

These projects also include the logo, logo variations, colors, and typefaces. These are all wrapped up in a brand book with all of the information that you, your team, and your vendors need to stay consistent.

How to ruin a brand project 

Brands are successful because of consistency. They are consistent because they have spent the resources and made a commitment to a great brand book. Here’s a secret that branding designers know—you will get bored of your brand! No matter how much you love it on day one, at some point you’ll think, “I’m so sick of seeing this!”. 

That’s a good thing—it means your brand is consistently applied, and it’s so mundane to you at this point that you can use your brand in your sleep. We give the same pep talk to clients—yes, you’ve seen this brand every day for five years, but your customers have not. You are still doing the work to stand out from the clutter. If your brand is still working for you, you have to let go that it’s no longer entertaining you personally. 

The quickest way to ruin the goodwill, legacy, and thousands of hours and dollars poured into your brand is to decide you are bored and to start to make tweaks. A new color here, a different lockup there. Pretty soon every department has a take on your brand and you have an inconsistent mush out in the market. Stay consistent, don’t let boredom get you, and don’t start fussing with your brand just for fun. 

Need more? This is one of our favorite branding books: The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding

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A brand isn’t meant to be artwork on a wall—a brand is something that works hard for your company. Knowing how to apply the logo and how the typefaces work together is just as important as having a logo and typefaces. A good branding project will not only deliver great work, but make sure you know how to use it. 

Knowing how to apply the logo and how the typefaces work together is just as important as having a logo and typefaces.

Often in a more extensive brand project, we’ll include a website, or other materials refresh. We have helped companies create Tone of Voice guides to keep everything from marketing copy to product microcopy on brand. The specific exercises and deliverables will be agreed upon when we meet and discuss options. 


Do you want to work with us to create your brand? Let’s talk. 

You may also be interested in our resource: Client Guide: Preparing for a Branding Project.